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Venice 2014

After Architecture

Unto This Last by John Ruskin

Unto This Last by John Ruskin

"Government and co-operation are in all things and eternally the laws of life. Anarchy and competition eternally and iall things, the laws of death." From Unto This Last, essay III

Unto This Last became the political tome of Ruskin's work. Claiming it was his greatest accomplishment, Ruskin switch to social and political commentary appeared as an abrupt turn from observers of his day, but was a natural transition for him. From his concerns for craftsmanship emerged his concern for meaningful labor for all, from his Christianity he developed a distaste for wealth, and from concern for moral art came his belief in beautiful spaces for all. All together, we can understand much of Ruskin’s political views as a form of socialism.[1] When Ruskin was expressing these views he was extremely controversial, challenging the dominant systems of his day. Even though during this period of his life he would come under the greatest attack, he found it to be some of the most meaningful work of his life.



[1] Clark, Kenneth. Ruskin Today. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1967.

Unto This Last by John Ruskin

Unto This Last by John Ruskin

"Government and co-operation are in all things and eternally the laws of life. Anarchy and competition eternally and iall things, the laws of death." From Unto This Last, essay III

Unto This Last became the political tome of Ruskin's work. Claiming it was his greatest accomplishment, Ruskin switch to social and political commentary appeared as an abrupt turn from observers of his day, but was a natural transition for him. From his concerns for craftsmanship emerged his concern for meaningful labor for all, from his Christianity he developed a distaste for wealth, and from concern for moral art came his belief in beautiful spaces for all. All together, we can understand much of Ruskin’s political views as a form of socialism.[1] When Ruskin was expressing these views he was extremely controversial, challenging the dominant systems of his day. Even though during this period of his life he would come under the greatest attack, he found it to be some of the most meaningful work of his life.



[1] Clark, Kenneth. Ruskin Today. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1967.